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From Hell
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I went into this having only seen 'The Book of Eli' by these directors, The Hughes Brothers. I quite liked that film, although I did feel their vivacious stylizations interfered with the telling of the story. Seeing this earlier film of theirs confirmed that suspicion, though it's still a fine film. Though Johnny Depp (the brothers' 5th choice for the lead) does a fine job as the film's protagonist (I haven't read Alan Moore's graphic novel yet, so I can't say how this filmic adaptation compares

Mean Girls
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I hardly ever watch contemporary American comedies in which most of the top cast are women (I still haven't seen either 'Clueless', 'Bridesmaids' or 'Heathers', for example), but recently I enjoyed 'The Devil Wears Prada', I have liked both Lindsay Lohan (especially in 'Bobby' and 'The Prairie Home Companion') and Rachel McAdams (most significantly in 'Redeye' and 'Passion'), so knowing that one of my favourite SNL comediennes, Tina Fey, both wrote and co-starred in this, made me give it a shot.

Colossus and the Amazon Queen
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When leading-man Rod Taylor passed away last year, I remembered his excellent performances in 'The Birds' and 'The Time Machine', and how his charm, good looks and manner could lift very good films such as those to greatness. I was also pleased that for his final role, he got to be in a very fine picture such as 'Inglourious Basterds', playing Winston Churchill--that he was able to end his career on a high-note, which sadly, is the exception rather than the rule. 'Colossus and the Amazon Queen'

Saw
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Though I tend to go for both older films (those made before 1970) and especially so when it comes to the horror/thriller genre, I saw parts 3 and 5 upon theatrical release (yes, I know it's really not right to see film series out of sequence but I simply don't care) and they were intriguing and decent, don't ask me why. Now that I both date a horror film aficionado and my 13-year-old son himself is one as well, I have decided to check out the contemporarily well-received original (I may d

Bob Dylan: Dont Look Back
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I'm a huge fan of both Bob Dylan and D.A. Pennebaker's documentaries, so to me, this was a no-brainer to watch, especially this vintage. I was fortunate to catch Dylan live, after his life-threatening bout of pericarditis, in Ann Arbor, Michigan at the Hill Auditorium with the Kenny Wayne Shepherd band as support, but how amazing it would have been to have caught him live on this British tour, from a generation earlier. I would have given it a perfect rating, but I docked a mark for him makin

Branded to Kill
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If someone both hated black-and-white films and movies with subtitles, I would encourage them to see this corker. It has 'hilarious masterpiece' written all over it. Suzuki's gangster movies are a cinephile's delight, to be sure--and this is one of his very best. I cannot recommend it highly enough. If you need a really good laugh, love cinema and haven't seen it yet, I would recommend you RUN to your nearest film store and take a chance on it. It'll be the best 30 bucks you've spent in a very l

Dog Day Afternoon
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Recently I have gotten on kicks for both watching and appreciating the works of director Sidney Lumet and the classic (i.e., 70's) performances of Al Pacino. Thus I came across this film, which I had on DVD forever. It'll interesting to watch the recent documentary on the character Pacino portrays, 'The Dog'--just found out about it earlier today. I loved Lumet's films he made before this that I've seen--'12 Angry Men', 'The Fugitive Kind', 'The Hill', 'The Anderson Tapes' and 'Murder on the Ori

Reservoir Dogs
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This unique take on the heist-film-gone-wrong was excellent--stylish and intelligently made, yet very funny and inexpensive. Tarantino's accolades from giving American cinema the resuscitation it needed mirrors what has happened, at least since the 70's, with Martin Scorsese's 'Mean Streets', both in terms of entertaining violence and usage of music in the scoring of films. I greatly thank Harvey Keitel for taking a chance on Tarantino back then--It paid off in spades.

Dracula
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Although it certainly won't make you easily forget earlier interpretations of the seminal horrific character by Max Schreck, Bela Lugosi, Sir Christopher Lee or Klaus Kinski, Gary Oldman definitely finds a way under your skin. As well, the resoundingly sumptuous cinematography will sweep you off your feet--unless you're dead to begin with... =)

The Deer Hunter
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With director Cimino's recent death and his reputation in tatters since the debacle of 'Heaven's Gate', I decided to visit 'The Deer Hunter'. Though over three hours long, it's astonishing, paced so achingly right and I can see why he rightfully earned the 'carte blanche' that would unfortunately lead to his downfall (as well as an entire studio's) as soon as he made his next film. But to reach such heights and to have such ambition--as well as undeniable talent--is a victory in and of itself. J